Jump to content

Welcome to Fastpitch Forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. This message will be removed once you have signed in.
Login to Account Create an Account
Photo

Softball's Olympic Reinstatement


  • Please log in to reply
119 replies to this topic

#61
Lena

Lena

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Niagara Falls

From breitbart.com:
 

TOKYO, June 5 (AP) - (Kyodo) The International Softball Federation said Thursday it has chosen Japanese pitcher Yukiko Ueno as one of the athlete ambassadors in a bid to reinstate softball in the 2016 Olympics.

 

If you want softball back in the Olympics, keep your fingers crossed that Tokyo is awarded the bid for the 2016 games. The two decisions will be made on the same day. Japan would insist upon softball being reinstated. The USA doesn't care.



#62
oir_cubbieblue84

oir_cubbieblue84

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
News article from Yahoo! News by Pirate Irwin, posted 6/14/09, 5:03 pm EDT:

Softball can advance women's rights in Middle East, says Prince Feisal

PARIS (AFP) – Should softball regain its place as an Olympic sport it could bring an improvement in women's rights in the Middle East, His Royal Highness Prince Feisal of Jordan told AFP on Sunday.

The 45-year-old—younger brother of King Abdullah II—said that the sport deserved to be restored for the 2016 Games after losing its spot post the 2008 edition.

The sport faces a potentially crucial week as it makes a presentation to the International Olympic Committee (IOC) Executive Board in Lausanne, Switzerland, to try and regain their status with two out of a list of candidates of rugby union, golf, baseball, rollersports and squash all competing for inclusion.

However, the Prince, a high-profile supporter of the sport, believes that softball more than deserves its place at the Games.

"I came across a woman recently from the United Arab Emirates, in her late 40s, who told me that by playing softball it was the first time she had been on a playing pitch with men," the Prince said.

"It is a sport that is extremely inclusive where anyone of any age can play and there is no dress code.

"It is neither elitist and has a good grass roots support. With regard to cultural sensitivities it is an ideal game. The sport seems to have outstanding appeal."

Prince Feisal became a fan of the sport while he was in the United States.

"Yes, I did play it in the United States when I studied there for 12 years," said the father of four.

"It is a very social game, really fast, not a contact sport and great fun."

The Prince insisted that by bringing softball back to the Games that it could help women's rights advance in his region.

"Yes, it could advance those (women's rights)," he said.

"In a more general sense it can only conjure up more interest in the Middle East if it is reintroduced into the Olympics because of course everyone sees appearing at the Olympics as being the pinnacle of their sporting career.

"But it is a sport that genuinely brings adults and children together and for the Middle East that is a case of breaking down barriers, which is rare for a sport but this one achieves that."

The final decision on which sports are accepted into the Olympics is likely to come in Berlin ahead of August's athletics world championships.



#63
Successfulgirl

Successfulgirl

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 19 posts
When Softball struck out of the 2012 Olympics, the ISF decided to do what it could to help reinstate it for the 2016 Olympics. It bothered ISF President Don Porter that the Olympic Committee didn’t view softball as universal and that it was constantly seen as “women’s baseball.” Back Softball has committed to not only spreading the word, but it is also making strides with its anti-doping campaign. Since they started the campaign there have been no positive tests in the Olympics and they are proud that it is a clean sport. The ISF is also hoping that this will play a key part in softball’s reinstatement.

The ISF also holds weekly and monthly clinics and seminars for everything softball including (but not limited to) coaching and fundamentals.
ISF is commited to bringing the sport of softball to everyone. They are currently holding wheelchair softball games and tournaments. There are many ways to help the ISF. Please visit www.internationalsoftball.com for more information on how you can get involved.

Courtney King/Nicole Gonzalez

#64
Successfulgirl

Successfulgirl

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 19 posts
TSC contributor Bobby Savich has some interesting thoughts on Team USA's dominance:

There are those who believe that softball should not be reinstated for the 2016 Summer Olmypics because of the dominance over the years from Team USA. However, just because one team is dominating in one sport should not determine whether or not that sport is removed from Olympic competition.

While Team USA has completely ruled the softball diamond over the years that does not mean softball should not be reinstated for the 2016 games. Unfortunately, because of the dominance by the Americans, it could be very difficult to convince the IOC members that softball should be reinstated for the 2016 games.

Committee members may feel that there is no excitement or suspense in Olympic Softball because of how dominating Team USA has been over the years. With members feeling there is not that strong level of competition among all the countries, they may decide to leave softball off the list of sports for 2016.

But the US is strong in other sports as well. Are you going to remove those sports from Olympic competition? For example, Men's Basketball is another sport where, while the rest of the world has begun to catch up to America, Team USA is still far superior to the other countries. In 1992 with the Original Dream Team, they won their games by over 40 points per contest, but it still remained an Olympic sport. Are you going to remove Michael Phelps from the pool for being such a dominant swimmer? It is just the way the world works, there is always going to be someone better than you at something.

Team USA has shown its dominance in just the last few weeks, by going unbeaten and winning the Canada Cup and taking a 5-0 record into Monday night's championship of the World Cup of Softball by outscoring their opponents 47-3. It is these results showing how strong the US is in softball that could unfortunately lead to the IOC saying no to reinstating the sport of softball for the 2016 Olympics.



#65
Lena

Lena

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Niagara Falls

This just breaking...

 

Quote
BERLIN (AP)International Olympic leaders are recommending golf and rugby for inclusion in the 2016 Summer Games.

The International Olympic Committee executive board selected the two Thursday from a list of seven proposed sports. Failing to make the cut were baseball, softball, squash, karate and roller sports.

 

http://sports.yahoo....p&type=lgns



#66
CrushersDad

CrushersDad

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 100 posts
The USA should boycott the 2016 Olympics. I know I am pissed beyond words.

Golf, you gotta be kidding...

#67
UWfan

UWfan

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Gender:Female
This is so sad.
"All your life you are told the things you cannot do. All your life they will say you're not good enough or strong enough or talented enough; they will say you're the wrong height or the wrong weight or the wrong type to play this or achieve this. THEY WILL TELL YOU NO, a thousand times no, until all the no's become meaningless. All your life they will tell you no, Quite firmly and very quickly. AND YOU WILL TELL THEM YES" -Nike

#68
amanda_cake

amanda_cake

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 188 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:VA
:-(

I'm not very happy about this, especially with all of the campaigning we've done, so to say.
<3 Amanda Kate

#69
Lena

Lena

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Niagara Falls

They'll try again for 2020.
 

OKLAHOMA CITY On a day when her sport lost another bid to get back into the Olympics, U.S. softball star Jennie Finch vowed to fight on.

 

http://www.google.co...FaNogwD9A2B6580



#70
SpartanIlliniCub

SpartanIlliniCub

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3808 posts
How much would you like to bet golf was admitted just so the IOC could exploit the publicity of Tiger Woods? Woods will play for free and the IOC gets to reap all the benefits.

This has NOTHING to do with softball not being an international sport or not. It has EVERYTHING to do with $$$.

#71
softball_chic_12

softball_chic_12

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 32 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Pennsylvania
agreed!

#72
fastpitchfan

fastpitchfan

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 518 posts
How much would you like to bet golf was admitted just so the IOC could exploit the publicity of Tiger Woods?

 

Obviously in retrospect this might have been a poor decision. unsure.gif



#73
SpartanIlliniCub

SpartanIlliniCub

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3808 posts
I heard a caller to a local radio show say that he was watching a Major League spring training game in Arizona and in between innings a 5-year-old kid came out to hit a few balls off of a tee and won a prize. The kid's name came up on the stadium billboard: TIGER! Some people who weren't paying attention even started booing when they saw the name. I feel real bad for that kid. Never name a child after a celebrity!

#74
fastpitchfan

fastpitchfan

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 518 posts

News article from The Washington Post website, posted 7/22/10, 12:53 PM EDT:

USA softball faces precarious future

By Jeff Latzke ASSOCIATED PRESS

OKLAHOMA CITY With the world championships approaching, Jay Miller gathered his U.S. national softball team for two days of practice and then headed off to another continent to play.

Gone are the days of a long, national tour to prepare for the competition. With the sport being dropped from the Olympics for at least the rest of the decade, there's a new, sobering reality for USA Softball.

Losing hundreds of thousands of dollars in support from the U.S. Olympic Committee means a limited travel schedule, less time to practice and no stipends that would allow players to give up everyday jobs.

"The biggest thing it hits is funding for the players," said Mr. Miller, in his second year as the U.S. head coach. "In the past, our Olympic years especially, kids could make a pretty good living playing for the national team, where now they can't."

The Americans arrived in Oklahoma City this week for the fifth annual World Cup of Softball, and the first since the IOC finalized its decision to keep softball off the program for the 2016 Olympics. It also won't be played in London in 2012.

Only three countries will be represented at this year's World Cup, the fewest yet, as other nations wouldn't pay for their teams to make the trip.

Instead of the tournament being played as a warmup for the world championshipsnow the sport's premier eventthe World Cup is taking place three weeks afterward. A major tournament in Canada also was canceled, although the U.S. went ahead with a four-game exhibition series against the Canadians.

Ron Radigonda, the executive director of the Amateur Softball Association that runs USA Softball, said he's already trying to coordinate next year's schedule for the Canada Cup and World Cup so teams from other continents can play both tournaments during a single trip to North America. For 2012, he hopes the World Cup and Canada Cup can be played just before the world championships in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory.

The softball team used to receive big payouts from the USOC each year, in part because it was a regular favorite to win gold.

Not anymore.

"We're at zero," Mr. Radigonda said. "We basically were not granted any funding from the USOC, so we went to zero. In non-Olympic years, we were at mid-six figures and in Olympic years we were much greater than that."

As a result, Mr. Radigonda said the plan now is for the U.S. team to condense its activities into a span of about two months each summer, between June and early August. In 2008, the team went on a 42-city tour starting in February and players were essentially wrapped up in team activities through the Olympics in August.

There's no way the association can afford to pay players for that long now.

"It's sad but it's true," two-time Olympian Natasha Watley said. "These women on this team, we have lives, we have to make a living. We have to pay rent and eat, and so I think that's a big part of it.

"The money isn't there and it's not as easy to stick around with it not being an Olympic sport."

Mr. Radigonda said he has also started talking to other countries about the possibility of creating a world softball tour, which he believes may be marketable to sponsors seeking exposure in other countries and potentially attractive to television.

The bottom line, though, is that the sport is most viable on an international level if it is part of the Olympics.

"You can't underscore enough how important that Olympic platform is because people understand that," Mr. Radigonda said. "The softball fans, they'll find us. I don't care if we're playing at 2 in the morning, they're going to figure out where we're at and they'll watch the game.

"What you need to have, though, is that Olympic program. It brings it just to the next level."

At this point, there's no telling whenor even ifthe sport will get back in. It was initially added in 1996, and the U.S. won the first three gold medals before losing to Japan in the 2008 gold-medal game.

The next possibility would be in 2020, the first Olympics that would be organized after the end of current IOC president Jacques Rogge's term runs out in 2013.

"I don't think that there's any way we're going to get back in until the IOC and international leadership changes, but that's going to change eventually," Mr. Miller said. "When we get a new IOC president who might be more favorable to softball, I think we have an opportunity then."

In the meantime, softball players are left to decide whether softball is a sacrifice they can make. Some are able to make a living playing in professional leagues in the U.S., including the four-team National Pro Fastpitch and the touring Pro Fastpitch X-treme, and in Japan. That's not the case with Team USA.

"It's not about the money," said Megan Langenfeld, who won the NCAA title with UCLA last month. "Being a female athlete, that's part of it. You could almost go across every sport. The women don't get paid as much as men do. So, it's definitely about the sport and your love for the game.

"You can't play this sport without having a love for it."


#75
jlurban

jlurban

    Administrator

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 1498 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Wheaton, Illinois
Team USA's Bound 4 Beijing Tour has been reincarnated, in a manner of speaking, by the National Pro Fastpitch league with its Back to School-College Tour (see the separate topic National Fall Tour).

#76
SpartanIlliniCub

SpartanIlliniCub

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3808 posts
It would be SO nice if the NPF could be the new all-star team that represents fastpitch rather than Team USA. The national team is a seasonal one at best and fastpitch will never generate the type of money it needs to become a serious league if Team USA leads the fight.

I really hope the Team NPF tour is a success. There is no reason it shouldn't be; it has practically the same roster as Team USA.

#77
softballmom

softballmom

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 112 posts
Softball may be out of the 2012 and 2016 Olympics, but that doesn't mean the fastpitch community should give up! What's being done to reinstitute the sport for 2020?

#78
jlurban

jlurban

    Administrator

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 1498 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Wheaton, Illinois
Efforts are just getting off the ground. Last month softball was named as one of eight sports being considered for inclusion in the 2020 Summer Games by the International Olympic Committee.

News article from the ESPNW website, posted 7/6/11, 1:38 EDT:

Softball still has long road to 2020

By Sarah Spain

On Monday, while you were no doubt enjoying a cold brew at a barbecue and watching fireworks, the softball world had something more than brats and dogs to cheer for. Inserted quietly into a news release revealing the events to be added to the 2014 Winter Games was a short list of sports to be considered for the 2020 Olympics—and softball was on it.

While news of softball's inclusion is huge, the sport still is one of eight vying for a single spot. The others to be considered by the International Olympic Committee are karate, roller sports, sports climbing, squash, wakeboard, wushu and baseball. In September 2013, the IOC will meet in Buenos Aires, Argentina, to select one sport to add to the program at the 2020 Games.

Not only does softball need to beat out seven other sports, the people in charge at the IOC also need to be convinced of its merit after dropping it from the Olympics several years ago. In 2005, the IOC elected to remove baseball and softball from the Olympic program for the 2012 Games, and in 2009, voted to keep them from the 2016 Games as well.

Those who voted to cut softball argued that the sport lacks appeal on a global stage, and the results of the first four Olympic softball competitions support their claims. The US won the gold in three of those four Olympics, outscoring its opponents 51-1 en route to gold in 2004.

The same man who led the charge to eliminate softball, IOC president Jacques Rogge, will still be the head honcho when the 2013 vote takes place, and some believe the reinstatement will not happen until he's gone.

Jessica Mendoza, a 2008 Olympian, is one of them.

"Without leadership change in the IOC, softball is not going to get back in," Mendoza told espnW's Pat Borzi last month. "The IOC is not the type of an organization that will say, 'We're wrong, softball can be back in.' They have to change enough where leadership will say, 'Why did we eliminate softball in the first place?'"

If it's true that the IOC cannot be convinced it eliminated softball in error, the International Softball Federation will need to prove softball has changed on a global level. Softball needs more teams and, more importantly, better teams. With funding on the decline—or nearly nonexistent—since the sport was eliminated from the Olympics, improving the caliber of competition is increasingly difficult.

Monday's announcement was a big step, but just one step on the long road to getting softball back into the Games.



#79
sballer4life

sballer4life

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 428 posts
The term of current IOC president Jacques Rogge is going to be critical. The vote for softball's possible reinstatement in the 2020 Games is set for 2013, the same year Rogge's term expires. What is the exact timing of these two events? Can he be re-elected?

#80
jlurban

jlurban

    Administrator

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 1498 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Wheaton, Illinois
News article from The Softball Channel website, posted 8/29/11, 2:01 PM CDT:

Softball's Olympic Future is Looking Up
Sport Added to Short List for Inclusion in 2020 Games

By TSC Contributor KAYLA KNIGHT

LOMBARD – For three long years the softball community has mourned the loss of its beloved sport from the Olympic Games, clinging to the hope that one day it will return. But when?

Re-entry dates of 2012 and 2016 have already been eliminated, but a faint heartbeat was heard for the turn of the decade when, last month, softball was added to the short list of sports considered for the 2020 Olympics.

While this news was huge, the chances of softball’s reinstatement are still about the same as hitting a home run off a Monica Abbott fastball.

First, softball must beat out the seven other sports being considered by the International Olympic Committee: karate, roller sports, sports climbing, squash, wakeboard, wushu and baseball.

Second, the members of the IOC—and especially president Jacques Rogge—will need a valid reason to reverse their earlier decision to eliminate it from the Games.

According to former Olympian Jessica Mendoza, it will take Rogge’s departure to get the job done. That could happen in 2013 when his term expires, although the timing will be close. The IOC meets September 2013 in Buenos Aires, Argentina, to select the one sport to be added to the 2020 program.

At minimum, the International Softball Federation will need to prove to the IOC that softball has become more globally popular than in 2005, when it was first voted out—a distinct possibility given Japan’s increasing competitiveness against the once-dominant USA. However, in most countries softball’s removal from the Olympics and the sputtering world economy have virtually dried up funding for the sport.

Yes, there is still much to be done, but softball’s Olympic future is looking up. After all, every so often someone hits a home run off a Monica Abbott fastball.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users