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Ultimate Energy Boost


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#1
CatOsterFan

CatOsterFan

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It seems like every other commercial on TV is hawking some sort of energy boost product.  Whether it's 5 Hour Energy, Gatorade, or the hundreds of prescription pill ads, it seems like the energy business is worth billions.   But I found something on Twitter today that makes sense as the preeminent energy boost:

 

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This seems like the truest way to obtain real energy.  The caffeine and refined sugar rushes of the TV products do provide a temporary boost, but they are guaranteed to give you a crash afterwards.  The egg provides a perfect amount of protein, and the banana gives natural unrefined sugars.  These two together are a potent mix that will provide the energy to perform at your best.

 

Looking for some energy?  Take the picture's advice and brush aside the caffeine and sugar for a hardboiled egg and a banana!



#2
fastpitchfan

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Bananas are a true athletic superfood--just ask Jamaican Olympic sprinter Yohan Blake who reportedly eats 16 of these delicious yellow-skinned tropical treats each day!

 

Bananas are rich in potassium and packed with vitamins.  They also contain three simple sugars (carbohydrates) for energy.  Two of them, glucose and fructose, each contain one sugar "unit" (monosaccharide) and as such are absorbed quickly into the bloodstream for a fast energy boost.  The body will use glucose as its main energy source and use fructose as a "backup."

 

The third sugar, sucrose (more commonly known as table sugar), contains two sugar units (disaccharide).  When sucrose is consumed, it is separated into its individual monosaccharide units of glucose and fructose.  Since this takes some time, sucrose acts more slowly to keep your blood sugar level stable and help avoid an energy "crash."






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